TRC Summary: The Response of Faithful Presence

As I leave Ottawa and my experience of the Truth and Reconciliation, I'm asking, "Now what?" For Canada. But also for myself.

In part, I wonder what my role is as a Christian. You see, Christians have been a major part of this historical blemish on our country, and this responsibility goes beyond official parties who ran the residential schools. My own tradition, the Mennonites (of all streams), either sat idly by or even perpetuated the system by working in various roles for these schools. We can't ignore this complicity. 

But we also can't stay in perpetual discomfort over our feelings of guilt or remorse as I reflected already (link). So far much of the Christian response to the TRC process has been necessarily reactionary: apologies and time spent listening. This needs to continue. But it's also time to imagine how Christians can become proactive in moving forward in relationship with our indigenous friends and neighbours.

I attended the TRC conclusion as part of a from of Mennonite Church Canada, Mennonite Central Committee, and Mennonite Brethren leaders, pastors, individuals, and students. We are a diverse group of men and women in various roles, who beyond the importance of our presence at the TRC, are exploring what it means for us as Jesus-followers to honour and respect the spirituality and practices of Canada's Aboriginal population. While I can't speak on behalf of others in the group, one key area for proactive response that I can have as a Christian in light of the TRC is in the area of faithful presence.

Sto:lo Nation - "The People of the River"
Far beyond just this issue, faithful presence is the call to value all people in our daily lives as worthy of our love, both in attitude and action. In my own community of Abbotsford, aboriginals are often visibly hidden. I have little memory growing up of encountering local aboriginal people in schools, parks or other local spaces. Or maybe I just didn't notice. I just remember driving through this mysterious place known only as "the reservation." But that was the extent of my interaction. Now I've learned Abbotsford sits on Sto:lo territory and in various settings I've begun to meet and develop relationships with some of these neighbours so visibly absent from my childhood. As Christians, we don't just love the neighbours that we see visibly in front of us. In fact, the NT concept of "lost" isn't limited to a spiritual loneliness for humanity. "Lost" can also describe the literal hiddenness of individuals and groups in the very social structures our communities. Faithful presence means Christians need to literally be present with all our neighbours, seen or unseen.  

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