"Theologies of Reconciliation"

Here a little over a week since I traveled to Ottawa to attend the final TRC event, I'm still reflecting on the impact of my experience. Helpful to my process of reflection was following the TRC in Ottawa, many in our group attended the NAIITS Symposium at Wheaton College entitled "Theologies of Reconciliation." The symposium is an intentional combination of indigenous and non-indigenous voices reflecting on how to understand reconciliation in the diversity of our culture. The time was rich in the experience of community and thought-provoking in considering the multiple perspectives on such a crucial topic.

http://www.naiits.com/symposiums/page53/

But as anyone who pays attention to past and present conversations on multicultural and Christianity, unity and understanding can be hard to come by. Latent (or explicit) racism, dominant paradigms, and divergent worldviews, to name a few things, often lead more to exclusion than relationship. For example, on the topic of forgiveness and repentance, several indigenous speakers highlighted the absence of specific words/terms in indigenous languages for "forgiveness" or "apology." Contrary to a Western paradigm which utilizes nouns - statements of reality - to describe reconciliation, indigenous languages are composed primarily of verbs. For indigenous people, then, reconciliation is fundamentally understood as an action, the ongoing life of "good relations" as several presenters suggested. This places reconciliation beyond an abstract concept or something to complete as I know I’ve often viewed it. Implied, then, are concrete practices that invite reconciliation. Words alone (including public apologies) aren’t enough. As settler people, then, to speak of reconciliation outside of the context of relationship with our indigenous neighbours will always be incomplete unless accompanied by, and sometimes preceded by, an actively lived out reconciliation.

This was just one example where my experience highlighted the importance of engaged theological reflection in multicultural contexts. Unfortunately in many churches, discussions of Christianity and indigenous spirituality are often approached with fear and suspicion. Or worse, judgement and condemnation. Christians rightly denounce language of the "Indian problem" that was so common in the colonial-era of residential schools, yet risk accepting that very same attitude when considering the relationship of Christianity and indigenous spirituality. This isn't to say differences don't matter. But in theological dialogue, attitudes are critical in order to form in ourselves the right frame of mind to engage the ideas we are considering. Engaged theological reflection means taking the time to learn the beliefs and practices of our indigenous neighbours on their terms. Education at all levels, particularly within Christian institutions, needs this type of engagement as an extension of our commitment to love of neighbour in relationships and learning.

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