relaxation

This week I’m back after two weeks of vacation.

I always find that coming back from vacation has me in a reflective state. I keep thinking about how fast the time went! And there emerges a distracting, yet welcome, pulse of memories that won’t go away. And I don’t really want them to.

As I return to the rhythm of “normal” life, I find myself asking, similar to last year, what’s the point of vacation and rest?

For this most recent vacation, one word comes to mind: relaxation.

To relax means to lessen something, be it tension, busyness, anxiety or other such things -  things that tend to characterize modern life.

As we camped with our two young children with little or no agenda (tenting with young ones requires some much flexibility), relaxation became main activity. The measure of a good day was in how relaxed we were by the end of it. Beaches, bike rides, ice cream, reading, fresh coffee, naps, swimming, and yes, more swimming made for one very relaxing vacation. We were very efficient in one important area: doing nothing. Our greatest accomplishment as a family was our relaxation.

But as I continue my post-vacation reflecting, I realize how times of relaxation bring a challenge to my return to the “real” world. A few questions linger:

-How do I define productivity?
-Is relaxation a worthwhile goal beyond a few weeks in the summer time?
-Has the modern motto, “work hard, play hard”, helped or hindered how I pace my life?

I may be done vacation for awhile, but I don’t think I’m done relaxing.


2 comments:

chris lenshyn said...

"The measure of a good day was in how relaxed we were at the end of it." - Sounds like a good Sabbath teaching to me! Good to hear your vacay was awesome!

David Warkentin said...

Hey Chris,

Yes, vacation always seems to provide this valuable reminder, even if I do struggle to integrate it the rest of the year.

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